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Imperial Theatre Seating Chart

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This guide on the Imperial Theater Seating Chart will help you find the best seats in the house. Get real-time seat availability and pricing, insider tips on the best seats and more.

Navigating the Imperial Theater Seating Chart


The Imperial Theatre has a total seat count of 1457, divided across 3 primary sections - Orchestra (ground level), Front Mezzanine and Rear Mezzanine. Check out real-time availability and recommended seats on our Imperial Theatre Seating Chart.

Imperial Theatre - Recommended Seats

Value for money seats
Center Orchestra - Any seats in Row H to P. Great view of the stage wihtout paying a hefty price.
Mezzanine - Center seats in rows D and E in the front mezzanine section and the front couple of rows (A-C) in the rear mezzanine are also value for money considering the clean view on offer and ticket prices.
If money were no matter
Center Orchestra - The middle seats (105-109) in the premium orchestras section (D to G)
Best views of the stage
Center Orchestra - The middle seats (105-109) in the premium orchestras section (D to G).The middle seats, numbered 1 to 13 in rows A to C of the mezzanine offer a great look at the stage.
Best Legroom
Row A in Orchestra and Row A in front and rear Mezzanine.

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Imperial Theater Banquette

The front orchestra of the Imperial theater was replaced with the stage surrounded by tables, giving it the appearance of a salon. The original stage was in turn transformed into a banquette with two sections, rear stage right banquette and rear stage right banquette.

It goes without saying that the banquette section offers the best view of the show, given its proximity to the stage. There are some table and seats placed around the stage area too, which also function as theater seating. Of the two banquette subsections, the right one is odd numbered and has 6 rows while the left is even numbered with 7 rows in total. The tables seat 4 people each on an average, while some tables have seating for 2 or 3 patrons, owing to the stage design.

We would recommend planning ahead and getting seats for the banquette section for a truly immersive theater experience. If being too close to all the action seems daunting, or partially facing the audience sitting on the other side of the theater doesn’t seem appealing, you can skip the banquette and look for seating in the orchestra or front mezzanine.

Imperial Theater Orchestra

Next up we have the orchestra section. Typically the orchestra is the biggest section of most theaters, but given the show's production design, half of the orchestra is used up for the stage. The rear orchestra section is where the regular, row-style seating begins. The section has 16 rows in total, divided into three subsection, the left, right, and center.

The centre orchestra section is further bisected with a runaway that connects to the stage area, used by performers for entrance and exit.

Within the orchestra section, the front few rows are the best, allowing for an intimate look at the stage, while also offering multiple possibilities for audience interaction if that is something you enjoy.


Imperial Theater Mezzanine

After the orchestra we have the front mezzanine section. Unlike the orchestra and stage, the mezzanine section hasn’t experienced any major renovation. Given the nature of the show, the performers do interact with the audience members seated on the front mezzanine, although to a lesser extent than the orchestra and banquette section.

The front mezzanine is the smallest section in the theater, with five rows in total, divided into four subsections with 8, 13, 8, and 13 seats per row, respectively. Talking about the view offered, the front mezzanine houses some of the best seats in the theater. The first few rows are typically considered the best, especially since they provide a complete look at the theater without any obstructions or blocks whatsoever. The last row of the FM section is also not too shabby, especially when compared to the last row of the orchestra, which gets partially obstructed by the mezzanine overhang.

Bringing up the rear is the rear mezzanine (pun intended!). Slightly bigger than the front mezzanine, the RM section has 7 rows split up into five sections with 7, 12, 14, 12, and 7 seats in each row, respectively.

Many reviewers have commented how they are no bad seats in the Imperial theater and that is true. Even the rear mezzanine, although quite far back from the main stage, offers a uniformly good view of the stage. The front few rows offer a great view of the stage, while the last row aren’t half bad either. If you wish to engage with the show and its performers though, the rear mezzanine is not meant for you.

30-Second Takeaway: Imperial Theatre


  • Seat selection is crucial, given that the theater has been remodeled to fit the Russian nightclub setting. Depending on the type of experience you wish to have, an immersive one where you interact with the performers or a traditional one, you can choose between the banquette and front orchestra or the front and rear mezzanine.
  • With all the modifications the theater witnessed last year, the leg space, especially in the front and rear mezzanine, still remains a point of contention for most patrons. If you or someone you’re watching the show with is tall, we would recommend either the front row of mezzanine or one of the tables on stage.
  • Unlike most theaters, the staff at Imperial waits for the restroom queues to end before they resume the show post intermission. So you don’t have to worry about missing parts of the show even if you’re waiting in queue.
  • The show is based on a particular section of the epic, War and Peace and the performance begins in a way that might confuse viewers who are not acquainted with the story. We would recommend scanning through the program, which has a brief synopsis of the play, to get up to speed.

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FAQs:


How many sections does Imperial Theatre have?

The Imperial Theatre has a total seat count of 1457, divided across 3 primary sections - Orchestra (ground level), Front Mezzanine and Rear Mezzanine.

Where are the best seats in Imperial Theatre?

The front mezzanine is the smallest section in the theater, with five rows in total, divided into four subsections with 8, 13, 8, and 13 seats per row, respectively. Talking about the view offered, the front mezzanine houses some of the best seats in the theater.

What is the seating capacity of Imperial Theatre, New York?

1,417.

Which section has wheelchair accessibility at Imperial Theatre?

Wheelchair designated spaces with up to three companion seats each are located in the Orchestra, along with nine transfer seats in the middle rows. A further three transfer seats are available in the Mezzanine and four in the Balcony, up two flights of stairs (23 steps).